Life In The Ted Lane

Navigating the Holiday Bustle with Autism: Peddler's Village Magic, Support Crisis Insights, Plus: Shark Mysteries Revealed

February 14, 2024 6630 Productions Season 1 Episode 13
Navigating the Holiday Bustle with Autism: Peddler's Village Magic, Support Crisis Insights, Plus: Shark Mysteries Revealed
Life In The Ted Lane
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Life In The Ted Lane
Navigating the Holiday Bustle with Autism: Peddler's Village Magic, Support Crisis Insights, Plus: Shark Mysteries Revealed
Feb 14, 2024 Season 1 Episode 13
6630 Productions

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Imagine strolling through a twinkling Peddler's Village, or the thrill of Broadway's lights reigniting after dark times. Join us as we recount the charm of a Pennsylvania hidden gem, where the holiday spirit meets artisanal shop discoveries. On a different note, we delve into the challenges and triumphs of navigating bustling spaces with autism, sharing strategies that help maintain calm amidst the chaos. This episode is for the explorer in you and for anyone looking to understand or manage sensory overload with grace.

We also open our hearts to the enchanting "Sound Detectives" podcast, while turning a critical eye towards the dire support workforce crisis impacting families of those with disabilities. With insights from Senator Bob Casey's advocacy efforts, this conversation aims to highlight this pressing issue and the urgent need for collective action. And for our curious minds, Ted's shark revelations promise to debunk myths and feed your fascination with the ocean's misunderstood predators. Let's embark on this journey of discovery, support, and the awe-inspiring world beneath the waves.

Written, Hosted, and Edited by Ted Harris
Co-Hosted by Lindsay Harris Friel
Music by Vincent Friel

More Info:


May your life be filled with magic!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a text message to say hi! We’d love to hear from you.

Imagine strolling through a twinkling Peddler's Village, or the thrill of Broadway's lights reigniting after dark times. Join us as we recount the charm of a Pennsylvania hidden gem, where the holiday spirit meets artisanal shop discoveries. On a different note, we delve into the challenges and triumphs of navigating bustling spaces with autism, sharing strategies that help maintain calm amidst the chaos. This episode is for the explorer in you and for anyone looking to understand or manage sensory overload with grace.

We also open our hearts to the enchanting "Sound Detectives" podcast, while turning a critical eye towards the dire support workforce crisis impacting families of those with disabilities. With insights from Senator Bob Casey's advocacy efforts, this conversation aims to highlight this pressing issue and the urgent need for collective action. And for our curious minds, Ted's shark revelations promise to debunk myths and feed your fascination with the ocean's misunderstood predators. Let's embark on this journey of discovery, support, and the awe-inspiring world beneath the waves.

Written, Hosted, and Edited by Ted Harris
Co-Hosted by Lindsay Harris Friel
Music by Vincent Friel

More Info:


May your life be filled with magic!

Ted:

Hello and welcome to Life in the Ted Lane. I'm your host Ted Harris. This is my co-host host, the big sister, the wide-eyed Piper next to my, mr Fiji Lindsay Harris Freel.

Lindsay:

I'm the rowdy, I'm rowdy, rowdy, piper, and you're Mr Fiji.

Ted:

Well, wrestlers have relationships too.

Lindsay:

So why am I rowdy? Rowdy Piper.

Ted:

I don't know, just sounds good. Okay, this is the podcast where we talk about my adventures Broadway and Hollywood news, muppet News and what's Like you Autistic In this Suga Brains. We're going to talk about my adventures we had last December and it's amazing. So wait a minute.

Lindsay:

so we're going to talk about your most recent adventure, which was to Peddler's Village, and also we're going to talk about Broadway Groces and how Broadway came back in 2024. And what's the Muppet News headline?

Ted:

Sesame Street launches a new podcast to educate kids and for funds that help caregivers for autism.

Lindsay:

Okay, so let's get started. That sounds great.

Ted:

Yes.

Lindsay:

Okay, so what's the first part that you want to talk about?

Ted:

The other day we went to Peddler's Village. It was quite amazing.

Lindsay:

What is Peddler's Village?

Ted:

Peddler's Village is like a little shopping village up in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

Lindsay:

Well, it's kind of near New Hope. It's in Lauska or I'm not sure if I'm pronouncing it right, but anyway.

Ted:

We noticed how well-developed the land had come since we were kids. In New Hope there's a lot of land. Sharks came in Sorry, putting in strip balls hotels.

Lindsay:

Land sharks.

Ted:

Well.

Lindsay:

Land shark.

Ted:

Very funny. We went to Peddler's Village in New Hope, Pennsylvania. Quite amazing.

Lindsay:

We went up there because it was Christmas time and we wanted to take pictures because we knew that they would be decorated for Christmas. Right, ted, yep, yep.

Ted:

We went up there because let's see what we got A photo of me in a sled, yep. Ted in a sled.

Lindsay:

You've heard of Elf on the Shelf. Get ready for Ted in a sled.

Ted:

All right. We saw a lot of it on Facebook too.

Lindsay:

Okay.

Ted:

We saw many different things. We saw a lot of junk stores, antique stores and craft stores.

Lindsay:

I don't think they were junk stores, I think they were sort of like interesting, interesting Chachkey stores.

Ted:

Well, a lot of stuff. We actually bought a gift for Vince.

Lindsay:

Yep.

Ted:

What he loves is a wind chime. Mm-hmm, there's a place that got broken. See the old wind chimes got broken into a storm. We saw a lot of missing craft stores.

Lindsay:

What did we see in the cigar store?

Ted:

We saw Mr Punch.

Lindsay:

Who's Mr Punch? Tell everybody who's Mr Punch Mr.

Ted:

Punch was a puppet a long time ago, back around the time when he was Shakespeare.

Lindsay:

Oh, older than that, ted.

Ted:

Maybe older than that, basically because he's short-way speaking. He spoke to a funny high voice which sounded like Mr Punch was having a little chicken.

Lindsay:

Yeah.

Ted:

So I was played on stage and played by a band and a white clown suit with big hump and a stick, a massive hook nose. Later he was played by a puppet and had a friend named Judy, a baby, a dog named Toby.

Lindsay:

And he would go around beating everybody up with the stick and people thought it was funny for some reason, yeah, all right.

Ted:

So we saw a lot of busy stuff and we saw this place where it's all games and toys, puzzles and games. Mm-hmm, there's a lot of puzzles and big places and once you went to my puzzle for us.

Lindsay:

Yeah, but there weren't any that you were interested in.

Ted:

Yeah, well, go figure.

Lindsay:

Hey, ted, what was the big orange and white thing that we saw in the parking lot?

Ted:

We saw.

Lindsay:

We took pictures of it.

Ted:

We saw a big fish, a big kale fish.

Lindsay:

It was a giant carp.

Ted:

Yeah, it was a big carp stack. It was a stand. I got pictures. We got pictures with it and big was it.

Lindsay:

It was as big as a car.

Ted:

There's a car.

Lindsay:

Yeah, like if you had parked a car, if you parked a Volkswagen Beetle next to it, it would be smaller.

Ted:

Yeah, and we also saw a chocolate chocolate store that would arrive at Boy Wonka. Oh, that was an amazing chocolate store, wasn't it? We saw a lot of fun. We bought some birdcrests from mom and in the basement they have candies from all around the different time periods and all that. Mm-hmm Beer barrels tix that. Now I am one hungry person.

Lindsay:

Yeah, I bet you are. I bet you're hungry now. Your eyes were as big as saucers when we were in that store. You didn't want to leave.

Ted:

I know.

Lindsay:

Yeah.

Ted:

And they had a verse or a chocolate, saw that and some things. We said some things.

Lindsay:

So it was starting to get crowded.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

So we decided to go home. But what, um, if you were, so if, if somebody was going to go there and they were autistic, or if a caregiver or a family member or friend of someone who has autism, we're going to go there? What do you think they should know before they go?

Ted:

Go early, probably the morning, make sure you're going to go to the meal, take top of breaks and play medicine. What kind?

Lindsay:

of medicine. Oh, whatever your medicine is what your medicine is, right, but basically you should be well. No, you should take your prescribed medication as needed, as your doctor directs it, right.

Ted:

Yep and basically stayed quite areas and all that.

Lindsay:

That's a good idea. Was it loud for you?

Ted:

No, it was fine.

Lindsay:

You were okay All right From CBS News. Okay, what does it say?

Ted:

If you're hoping to see a Broadway show, how about two tickets for a price one? Tickets are not on sale for Broadway weeks. Other big shows are discounted Tickets myself for performances January 16th or February 4th. For a list of purchasing shows, go to NYCtourismcom. Slash Broadway week.

Lindsay:

Okay, so that's pretty good. That's some pretty good news, isn't it? Then, um, so that was CBS News talking about Broadway week and they said for a list of participating shows, visit NYCtourismcom. Slash Broadway week. Then, um, the roundabout theater is going to stage Pirates of Penzance and Yellow Face, which looks exciting, and Daniel Day Kim is returning to Broadway and David Henry Huang's Yellow Face. And there was something else that we saw here. I think we got it, I think we covered it. Okay, good, all right, so that was our Broadway news. That was important. And, ted, or what is the next? What's the next item on your Sesame Street launch to the podcast.

Lindsay:

Wait a minute, Ted. What kind of news is this now? Muppet news Muppet news. Okay, let's pause for a moment.

Ted:

We are looking at this new podcast done by Sesame Ward Shop. It is called Fully of Friends. It is about a newest and furry friendly boxer called Fully. She has a house around podcast Sesame Street podcast with Fully Friends. She has a rising soul. She can make a basically realistic sound with her voice. That comes in handy with Fully and her microphone pal Mikey. Welcome to our guest in the Southern studio at the top of the Superheroes Amels, birthdays and more. Jo and Fully and her Sesame Street friends, elmo Cookie Monster, abby Grover from Music Jokes. It gives them podcasts where they're learning about when the fun never ends.

Lindsay:

Yeah, that sounds like a good podcast idea. You think we should give it a listen and find out if it's good.

Ted:

Yes, we should, definitely should.

Lindsay:

We should try that. So, Ted, do you know what the word Fully means?

Ted:

Fully is created by the sound artist, mimicking the actual sound source and recordings to do. Often there are many little sound effects that happen, so any given sound or movie process or recording them can be all time consuming.

Lindsay:

Okay. So, Ted, what can you think of some examples of like how Fully works?

Ted:

If you do a wool, follicle to your own voice.

Lindsay:

Right, let's say you wanted to make it sound like it was raining. What could you do?

Ted:

Pour can of dried beans onto a piece of wood.

Lindsay:

That would work. You could also. You could also just pour water onto something Like a paper plate or a plastic plate or something. What would be a way that you could make it sound like horses galloping?

Ted:

Coconuts on sand, on a piece of wood.

Lindsay:

Yeah, we've seen that one before. My friend, my friend Ellie Maitland, is a fully designer in Chicago and she is a fully artist and she performs fully sounds with live shows and she is truly amazing and really exciting and maybe one of these days you could get to meet her and we could talk about how sound effects are made for different things. Okay, and anyway, yeah, so that's something interesting to think about, isn't it?

Ted:

Yes.

Lindsay:

Another thing you might want to talk about, Ted. What's that great podcast we've been listening to lately?

Ted:

We've been listening to Sound Detectives.

Lindsay:

Sound Detectives. Tell everybody what Sound Detectives is about.

Ted:

Sound Detectives is done by LaVara Burton. That's by a detective hunch who is partnered with Audi the Earer. She's an actual earer. And then they have to locate missing sounds or missing, and they have to identify the sounds. The sweet sass fell in the way of the magic wand.

Lindsay:

So when they find a sound, they hear the sound that confirms that they've. Oh, they so they have sounds, but they don't know where the sounds came from and they have to return the sounds to their correct places, right?

Ted:

Right.

Lindsay:

So can you give me an example?

Ted:

They found a car door. They found whales.

Lindsay:

Well, wait, oh, spoilers Ted. So they found like a blzzz sound.

Ted:

A blzzz sound in a box.

Lindsay:

Yeah.

Ted:

They have to identify the sound.

Lindsay:

And so what did they do? How did they go about identifying the sound?

Ted:

They go to various places all around the world.

Lindsay:

Yep.

Ted:

And they look for the sound.

Lindsay:

They look for where the sound may be missing.

Ted:

Yep.

Lindsay:

Yep, they also have a section about how ears work, right.

Ted:

Yeah, waxing on ears.

Lindsay:

Waxing on ears, which is hilarious but also very informative, so I like that podcast a lot. What do you think of it?

Ted:

I spoil a little second season.

Lindsay:

I hope that there will be a second season too. It's very good. So we don't want to spoil anything for you, but definitely go listen to Sound Detectives. It's a great show.

Ted:

Autism news. Autism news.

Lindsay:

There is a direct support workforce crisis right Ted.

Ted:

Yeah, yep, because of COVID-19, research spending places have been able to hire caregivers.

Lindsay:

Because of yeah, there's a caregiver shortage.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

Angkor commissioned a study to find out what the issues are with America's direct support workforce crisis. Basically, a lot of people who are aging or disabled, who want to stay in their homes and either don't want to go into congregate what they call congregate care or, you know, they don't want to go into a permanent living situation where they're cared for. Or maybe they can't afford it because it's too expensive, or maybe it's just not their bag. A lot of times they would rather be with their families, like Ted. Ted would like to live with his family. You need somebody to come and help you with stuff right, yeah.

Lindsay:

Yeah, what are some things that you need help with?

Ted:

Like getting out of the community and stuff.

Lindsay:

Yeah, sometimes you need help with stop and think and sometimes you need help with getting your get up and go.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

Yeah, so you need people to do stuff with you during the day so that we can be a family, right.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

Yeah, and we have had. We can't find somebody to go out and do stuff with you in the community, which is very frustrating and it means that you and I are spending all of our free time together.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

Yeah, and it's hard, because I know that you and I love each other, but also.

Ted:

We can't let each other stirs.

Lindsay:

Yeah, we drive each other up the wall sometimes and it's tough.

Ted:

I know.

Lindsay:

But I still love you.

Ted:

I know Sometimes it's difficult to find really character-a-referred.

Lindsay:

I don't know why people think that it's a bad idea to work with people who need help.

Ted:

I know.

Lindsay:

It sucks and we're trying to find somebody to be a community engagement person for you who can basically they would meet up with you and take you to go do things like going to well you know museums and stuff like that.

Ted:

Museums, movies, art places, outdoor gardens, nature preserves the gym, help with shopping, help with collecting, do errands.

Lindsay:

Yeah, that kind of thing. And one of the things that's really weird is I don't understand why people don't Remember when we had the first job interview. Yeah, and she said what do you think of the Muppets? And she said well, I don't really know anything about the Muppets, and it was kind of like oh no.

Ted:

Oh boy.

Lindsay:

Oh boy, Like oh boy. Wrong answer.

Ted:

No.

Lindsay:

I mean, it turned out, you know she was right for the job, but she didn't want the job. So that was the end of that anyway, I know. I can't understand. Anyway, getting to the point, there is a caregiver, there is a direct support workforce crisis, but right now, senator Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, where we live, is working on trying to get more funding and more support from the government for people who work as caregivers. Right, ted?

Ted:

Yep.

Lindsay:

Yep. So we just sent a letter to his office to ask him what we could do to call attention to this, and hopefully, if we hear back, we will get you know some more information about it. But in the meantime we are hoping that there will be more support for because the other thing too, ted, is that the America's population in general is aging and people should take care of each other.

Ted:

I know, I feel it's important that people with autism reach full potential. I feel we should do our best to help people with autism and caregivers and hardware caregivers, and help them do our best to do what's right. After all, it's a big role. We all have to do our part.

Lindsay:

That's absolutely true, right, ted?

Ted:

Yep, I also learned about sharks this week.

Lindsay:

Oh, you learned about sharks.

Ted:

Yep, there are 300,000 types of sharks in the world. Really, basically, sharks get bad reps sometimes and basically the great white shark and the tiger shark basically get the most bad reps. But sharks really attack humans. Basically, the bull shark has the most hard bite and basically it stays at first for hours but then migrates to saltwater.

Lindsay:

Is that?

Ted:

true, it's true, it's true.

Lindsay:

Where are some places that people can learn more about sharks?

Ted:

If you can learn more about sharks, you can look it up at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium or at the Adventure Aquarium.

Lindsay:

Where's the Adventure Aquarium?

Ted:

Right Adventure Aquarium is in New Jersey or you can visit any type of aquarium or look up at your local library milk store. All the pictures.

Lindsay:

Yeah, Tay-Ted, do you remember that time that we went to the Adventure Aquarium and we walked through the tunnel underneath the aquarium?

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

So it was like a big glass roof over us.

Ted:

Yep.

Lindsay:

How did you feel when we were going through that?

Ted:

All nervous, but I handled it.

Lindsay:

Yeah, you did handle it. I was a little nervous too. It's um. Yeah, that was a little nerve-wracking, but it's beautiful, isn't it? Yep, yeah, I got a picture of you standing with your back to the wall and a shark coming up behind you.

Ted:

Oh.

Lindsay:

And your face was pretty terrified.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

Should we put that picture on our website? You think, yep, yeah, so maybe we should put that picture up. That was a fun day, though, wasn't it?

Ted:

Yep.

Lindsay:

Yeah, maybe we should go again sometime soon. So for people who have autism, or people who love people who have autism, who are thinking about going to the Adventure Aquarium, what should they know in advance?

Ted:

Talk to them first and know you will see a lot of fish and this is a very exciting time and you should see many things and you will see various fish and basically just how good time.

Lindsay:

And use the bathroom.

Ted:

Use the bathroom.

Lindsay:

And also make sure you have a good snack and everything before you go. Yep and um, that's pretty much everything. I know that it it did get a little noisy in there, but we also went on a Saturday. Yeah, yeah, it might be less crowded if you go during the week. I don't know.

Ted:

Yeah, but maybe we should go again. Yep, so that's for now. Um, I'm Ted Harris and hey Ted.

Lindsay:

What are some things that we're looking forward to doing in the future? I know this weekend you're going to go see mom.

Ted:

This weekend I'm going to see mom and I look forward to seeing more shows, maybe doing a live shows and maybe have having a space on Facebook and maybe our first YouTube videos for YouTube. Maybe, no, maybe we might do our first web show.

Lindsay:

That's interesting. That would be an interesting idea. How do you know what? I think people should write to us and tell us if they would like us to do a show on YouTube or, you know, do a show live, or something.

Ted:

Yep, and if you like what you see, tell people like people hate all people. That's part of our shows and remember you can see my videos on youtubecom. It's youtubecom Plus Ted Harris puppets. You can also learn more about us. You can learn more about us at 6, 6, 30 productions and you can write to us at infoat 6, 6, 30 productioncom. Also, here are other podcasts on Buzzsprout, the life of the 10 ladies, slash buzzsproutcom, where you listen to us. On Apple podcast, if you like to show to your friends and any of your life review on Apple podcast or pod chaser, and I hope you have a good time. So that's it for now. I'm Ted Harris Harris of Harris Productions and we hope to see you stay tuned for more life in the 10 lane. That's it for now. Bye.

Lindsay:

Bye.

Ted:

Life in the 10 lane production of Harris Productions and 66 30 productions featuring Ted Harris. Koso Studio by Lindsay Harris. Freel Music by Buzzsprout, edit by Ted Harris. For more information, visit our website at 66storyproductionscom. Wwwyoutubecom, wwwyoutubecom, wwwyoutubecom, wwwyoutubecom, wwwyoutubecom, wwwyoutubecom.

Peddler's Village, Broadway, and Muppet News
Sound Detectives and Support Workforce Crisis