Life In The Ted Lane

Philly Treasures, Hollywood Tensions, and Inspiring Muppet Magic: A Colorful Journey Through Art, Film, and Fair Pay

June 15, 2023 6630 Productions
Philly Treasures, Hollywood Tensions, and Inspiring Muppet Magic: A Colorful Journey Through Art, Film, and Fair Pay
Life In The Ted Lane
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Life In The Ted Lane
Philly Treasures, Hollywood Tensions, and Inspiring Muppet Magic: A Colorful Journey Through Art, Film, and Fair Pay
Jun 15, 2023
6630 Productions

Send us a text message to say hi! We’d love to hear from you.

Ever wanted to discover the hidden treasures of Philadelphia, learn about Hollywood labor tensions, and explore a heartwarming film project? We've got you covered! Join us as we share our thrilling experiences at the Magic Gardens, Museum of Illusions, and Philadelphia Zoo, where we met adorable red pandas and otters. Plus, get an inside look at Cherry Street Pier's amazing art store that supports the Arc of Philly organization and features the incredible work of cognitively challenged individuals.

Hollywood is heating up, and we're here to talk about the Writers Guild of America's ongoing dispute with producers. We'll discuss the crucial issues at stake, such as fair pay, pension plans, health funds, and residuals, as well as the rise of mini rooms and the potential impact of artificial intelligence on scriptwriting. And if that's not enough drama for you, we'll also touch on the recent developments with SAG-AFTRA and the possibility of a strike.

Lastly, let's dive into the world of Muppets and inspiring film projects! We'll discuss the upcoming Jim Henson exhibition at the Maryland Center for History and Culture and introduce you to Made with Love,   – an incredible film featuring Jay Carr, the only male actor with Down syndrome in the project. You'll be inspired by Jay's love for color and creativity, and learn how his story has the power to change perceptions and uplift those who may see themselves as not capable. Don't miss this fun, informative, and feel-good episode!


May your life be filled with magic!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a text message to say hi! We’d love to hear from you.

Ever wanted to discover the hidden treasures of Philadelphia, learn about Hollywood labor tensions, and explore a heartwarming film project? We've got you covered! Join us as we share our thrilling experiences at the Magic Gardens, Museum of Illusions, and Philadelphia Zoo, where we met adorable red pandas and otters. Plus, get an inside look at Cherry Street Pier's amazing art store that supports the Arc of Philly organization and features the incredible work of cognitively challenged individuals.

Hollywood is heating up, and we're here to talk about the Writers Guild of America's ongoing dispute with producers. We'll discuss the crucial issues at stake, such as fair pay, pension plans, health funds, and residuals, as well as the rise of mini rooms and the potential impact of artificial intelligence on scriptwriting. And if that's not enough drama for you, we'll also touch on the recent developments with SAG-AFTRA and the possibility of a strike.

Lastly, let's dive into the world of Muppets and inspiring film projects! We'll discuss the upcoming Jim Henson exhibition at the Maryland Center for History and Culture and introduce you to Made with Love,   – an incredible film featuring Jay Carr, the only male actor with Down syndrome in the project. You'll be inspired by Jay's love for color and creativity, and learn how his story has the power to change perceptions and uplift those who may see themselves as not capable. Don't miss this fun, informative, and feel-good episode!


May your life be filled with magic!

Ted:

3. Hello and welcome to the episode of Life through the Ted Lane. Your host, ted Harris, is the sBeaker next to my Bunsen Hunney dew Lindsay.

Lindsay:

Hello everyone, me me, me, me me me.

Ted:

Isn't she a Peach.

Lindsay:

I'm a peach. Oh, thank you, ted. So if you're so, you're Bunsen, you're the one who sets up the experiments, and I'm Beaker the one who gets blown up.

Ted:

Yes.

Lindsay:

That's what I thought. Okay, so, ted, today we are going to talk. This podcast is about what Ted.

Ted:

This is about our adventures and Broadway and Hollywood news and Muppet news and autism stories, so we're going to talk about recent adventures. We did, yeah, so I think I went to the magic gardens of of in South Street, philadelphia.

Lindsay:

So what are the magic gardens, ted?

Ted:

Magic gardens are a big maze, be it a cement with tiles and mosaics and glass bottles and bike tires and wheels and crevice. Isaiah Zagar and his family. I got to see a lot of Mexican Prumier art tiles.

Lindsay:

Mexican what?

Ted:

art Mexican and Prumier tiles and art.

Lindsay:

Art and Peruvian tiles.

Ted:

We wanted to show the cultural style side of Philadelphia. The confusing part was going up and down steps of those stories. It reminded me of the Mercer Museum at Vaughel Castle and people should go there. They should get their tickets in advance. The only drawback is the only drawback is it's somewhat expensive and you have to pay my card. But it's worth going to.

Lindsay:

So that sounds interesting. Ted, ted, do you remember when we got those, didn't we get mosaic tile kits that we were going to make?

Ted:

Yes.

Lindsay:

Do you still want to make them? Oh well is that a maybe?

Ted:

That's a maybe. Okay, i also visit the Museum of Illusions.

Lindsay:

The Museum of what.

Ted:

Museum of Illusions. It's like a big Instagram playground full of optical illusions. There's a tilted room, a room that makes you big or small. There's one part that makes you look as if you're standing on a building.

Lindsay:

Standing what?

Ted:

Standing on a building There are a lot of puzzles, magic eye pictures, optical illusions. I was trying to solve a few puzzles, or some easy and other hard. There's one tilt that made you look like you're flying in space. There are a few holograms. We saw a group of people trying to solve the puzzles and laughing. There's a woman with two girls. they solve the puzzles. That is one bright group of girls. We also saw an upside down room. We looked at where you looked as if you were standing on the ceiling. Yeah.

Lindsay:

So, ted, what kind of room was it?

Ted:

This is the tables and chairs were on the ceiling. The pictures were upside down. It was stood there, the technical picture. You flipped it over, uh-huh, and they looked like we were standing on the ceiling.

Lindsay:

Yeah, it was pretty cool, huh.

Ted:

After Museum we went to Cherry Street Pier. We had lunch. We saw the beer gardens and we had a couple of root beers. We saw an art store sponsored by the Ark of Philly which is featured art by Cognitive Challenge People. I said hello, there's a lot of art novelties to my Cognitive Challenge People. There are many paintings with drawings, with trinkets for my Cognitive Challenge People. Percentage of the proceeds go to the artist, rest goes to Ark of Philly. The Ark of Philly is two orchards per year, one spring, one for fall.

Lindsay:

Hey Ted, what is the Ark of Philly?

Ted:

The Ark of Philly is associated with retarded citizens. I find the word retarded pretty hurtful.

Lindsay:

Yeah, and it sort of seems like they have to keep it because they're stuck with it. So the people know what they're doing. I think now they call it SPARK, like S-P-A-R-C.

Ted:

I think that's right.

Lindsay:

Yeah, but they have the Ark of Delaware County and the Ark of Philadelphia and so on and so forth.

Ted:

And the Ark of New York.

Lindsay:

But you know what's kind of interesting, ted, if it's other people who can't adjust to the fact that the word retarded is outdated, who's retarded?

Ted:

Yeah, yeah, who is?

Lindsay:

Yeah, exactly, all right. So if people want to find out more about the SPARK store at Cherry Street Pier, what should they do?

Ted:

They should check on our show notes below, or they should go to sparkphillyorg. So it's S-P-A-R-C.

Lindsay:

Phillyorg.

Ted:

Right sounds cool.

Lindsay:

All right. So what else is going on Ted?

Ted:

We saw the apples we missed before. at the Philadelphia Zoo We saw the rhinos and zebras and giraffes and hippos and cheetahs. The one good part is I don't have to take a picture of a rhino butt for my father.

Lindsay:

Ted, why did you always have to take a picture of a rhino butt for dad?

Ted:

I don't know, because he thought it was funny.

Lindsay:

He would always say please take a picture of the rhino's butt.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

I think he used to do a thing where he would get the picture printed out and mail it to his friends saying thinking of you.

Ted:

Wow.

Lindsay:

Yeah, because dad had a real dad, had a rarefied sense of humor.

Ted:

I know.

Lindsay:

Yeah, anyway.

Ted:

Cheetahs are a prosper.

Lindsay:

Oh, you saw cheetahs.

Ted:

Yeah, we saw cheetahs. Yeah, We also saw the red panda, did you really? Yes, we did.

Lindsay:

I have never seen the red panda. Ted, Tell me more about it. What was the red panda doing?

Ted:

It was hanging on a tree. It was rare to see the red panda because red panda is only quiet at night. The best time to see a red panda is let down or during the evening. And the otters? you ought to know. You ought to know They were getting ready to have their dinner. Otters eat fish and clams and see what it plays mostly. We stopped at the picnic ground. We had an ice cream. We saw the tree house. It had been there since the 80s. It was a little empty, except for a couple of families with kids. I saw the dinosaurs, the Roma dinosaurs on loan. I saw a number of dinosaurs with giant bucks and trash on the highbees. We also saw the apes that were either dinner or get ready for bed. It was kind of like when Lizzie and I were kids getting ready for bed. We saw the grandma tiger that's still lover to the lions. after that we came hot, had dinner.

Lindsay:

Hey, ted, i have a question. Why were the apes getting ready for bed, like you and me when we were little, getting for bed?

Ted:

We were off again on control. We were jumping around here and there and definitely right here and there, just remember.

Lindsay:

Yeah, that sounds like us, Ted And mom, walking around saying today is over. Yeah no-transcript is over. Today is over. Remember how she used to say that to us and we deserved it.

Ted:

Yeah.

Lindsay:

So that's your adventures. So what's the next section that you want to talk about?

Ted:

The writer's guilt strike.

Lindsay:

Okay, so I'm going to talk about the writer's guilt strike a little bit, because this I've been following this and I would like to talk about it because, also, the news changes so quickly that it's very hard to keep up with. So, as of today, or as of yesterday, actually, sag AFTRA, which is the Screen Actors Guild and I can't remember what AFTRA stands for, i feel dumb They have their members have approved a strike authorization by an overwhelming margin. So these are the people who work on set. It's the actors and the people who they make the magic happen. Along with the writers, the writers also make the magic happen. We know that There could be magic without writers. It just wouldn't make any sense.

Lindsay:

Members of SAG AFTRA have voted to strike if they can't reach a deal with studios over a new contract by June 30th, underscoring widening labor tensions across Hollywood. The vote was approved by a 98% margin, the union said Monday night The endorsement gives the union more leverage and in negotiations with studios that begin Wednesday, on behalf of its 160,000 performers and broadcasters. So that would mean anybody who is filming a movie or a TV show, it would mean news broadcasters, so on and so forth. Right, ted, yeah, now, but the directors Guild and Hollywood studios have reached a tentative deal. This was let me check the date on this Actors, screenwriters and actors likely want a rewrite of the director's contract.

Lindsay:

So the writers Guild of America has been striking for five weeks and the first Guild to make a deal with the AMPTP, which is the America motion picture and television something. They have contract terms and the director's Guild of America said, okay, yeah, we'll work with you, but SAG after. And the WGA said we're not going to just roll over and play dead. So actually this is very interesting here. One moment please. Contract talks between SAG-AFTRA and the AMPTP are set to begin on Wednesday and the SAG-AFTRA contract expires on June 30th. Leaders of the Performers Union are currently seeking a Kempipa. The Director's Guild of America, which still requires approval from the Union's members, includes significantly higher foreign residuals for streaming series. So that means that if they make a streaming series, like on Netflix or something, and it goes to Netflix in the UK or Netflix in Africa or whatever, they get more money for it. A first year minimum salary increase of 5% and, following Alec Baldwin's fatal shooting of cinematographer Halnea Hutchins on the Rust movie set in October 2021, the banning of live ammunition on sets.

Ted:

Wow.

Lindsay:

Well, i didn't know that they used live ammunition on sets. I thought I was very surprised to find out that they used real bullets. I thought they just used a thing that went blam, blam.

Ted:

I thought they used the planks.

Lindsay:

Yeah, so did I. So the DGA added that its new three year agreement includes a clause about artificial intelligence, saying its contract confirms that AI is not a person and that generative AI cannot replace the duties performed by members.

Ted:

I think they're pretty wild and all that. I think, they should get their act together. I think they should learn the process and I think they should get their act together and make the pieces fit.

Lindsay:

Yeah, they should get their act together and make the pieces fit.

Ted:

I know.

Lindsay:

Listen, i'm going to tell you another thing. There's an article in Vulture about what the writer strike means for your favorite shows and, to make a long story short, late night shows. the writer's rooms can't write, so that means shows like what Ted.

Ted:

The Tonight Show.

Lindsay:

Yep like The Tonight Show or Late Night with Stephen Colbert.

Ted:

Late Night with Conan.

Lindsay:

Yeah, last week tonight with John Oliver, late Night with Seth Meyers, nbc's Tonight blah, blah, blah All those shows they can't shoot because the writers aren't there and they can't write Linear TV. So this would include network TV. This includes NBC's Night Court, and I got to tell you right now I think I tried to watch a little bit of NBC's Night Court, the new one. Let's move on. Let's move on. Disney Channel's Bunked has had production shut down on season seven. Star's P Valley is delaying production. Most major network TV shows, such as Abbott Elementary, the Chicago Procedure Rules, have already wrapped for the summer. However, if the strike extends as long as the 2007-2008 strike did, that would eat into the prep time for those shows before they return in the fall. The strike also affects pilot season, meaning that we're probably not getting that many new shows in the fall. The previous writer strike pretended an increased focus on reality TV. Yeah, you know what People should listen to. Audio Drama Podcast, ted. You know what Think about, ted. What are some Audio Drama podcasts that we've been listening to?

Ted:

Audible.

Lindsay:

No, not. Audible's a streaming service for podcasts and audiobooks. But what was the What's?

Ted:

the story The Bohr Night.

Lindsay:

Yeah, we've been listening to The Bohr Night, so can you tell everybody what The Bohr Night is about Elphat implied And or amplified. Oh, Elinor amplified. Yes, that's a W-H-Y-Y show. But Ted, tell us what The Bohr Night is about.

Ted:

The Bohr Night is about a Bohr somehow turns into a knight with a moon as full. He has to find a cure for his Wermanism. Yeah, he has Wermanism and he has to find What kind of He has to find a moon pearl to get to the surface before the full moon.

Lindsay:

He has to find a moon pearl, which you can only find at the bottom of the ocean, And he has to get back to the surface before the moon is full So he can cure his horrible case of Wermanism. And who is helping him? Ted.

Ted:

A gnome and a dwarf.

Lindsay:

So the gnome does. What's the gnome do?

Ted:

He plays a lot of music.

Lindsay:

He's a bard And the dwarf is A navigator, navigator, and she's the Bohr Night's squire.

Ted:

Yep.

Lindsay:

So a squire is like your assistant, And they have had a lot of crazy adventures happen, haven't they? Ted?

Ted:

Yep.

Lindsay:

Where did they go? What kind of? What do you remember about all these adventures?

Ted:

I remember the squid.

Lindsay:

Yeah.

Ted:

And a giant serpent.

Lindsay:

Yeah.

Ted:

And the Tommy and the Spire web.

Lindsay:

Uh-huh.

Ted:

And the red tide.

Lindsay:

Yeah, the undersea. They're worried about the red tide and he has to help keep the citizens of the undersea world safe from the red tide. And what about that song last time, ted?

Ted:

Oh wow, It was kind of like Weird Al.

Lindsay:

I am the king of the ocean. I am the king of the ocean. And it just keeps going and going and there's a new key change and a new rhythm and a new layer of music. every time, every verse, there's a new layer to it. The song just gets more and more complex.

Ted:

So the songs are kind of like this yes, or 80s or 90s style or disco.

Lindsay:

Yeah, i would love it if you would draw pictures of the characters from the Borneight, because I think it would be really cool. Tell everybody what you remember about. Oh, what's another show that we? What's another podcast that we listened?

Ted:

to together Otter Space.

Lindsay:

Otter Space. That was a really good one. What was that one about That?

Ted:

was about Otter Fighting Aliens.

Lindsay:

In Space right.

Ted:

Space Belt, otters being kidnapped by my aliens and all that they have to save the world and What it.

Lindsay:

What did they do?

Ted:

They returned the ocean to the, to the wall, to earth.

Lindsay:

You know what, ted? the episode about Baba Yaga is called Baba Yaga Karen saga and It's from this past January and it is Really fun with a great piece of music called swamp witch. This is hard for me to say. Swamp witch swing. There's a tongue twister for you. Okay, do you want to know what the writers want? Yes, okay, this is what they want. The Guild has build the issues. The writers Guild of America has built the issues behind the labor dispute as an existential crisis. So the first thing they want is increased pay. There are Basically, there are more jobs available to WGA members because there's so many streaming services, but Ten years ago, 33% of TV writers were paid the minimum rate and now 49% are paid the minimum rate.

Lindsay:

Oh so accounting for inflation over the past ten years. Writer pay has gone down 14% in the last ten years.

Ted:

I'm sorry in the last five years.

Lindsay:

The median weekly writer, writer, producer pays down 23% over the last decade and that's with inflation factored in. Writers say many of their members aren't even making a living wage. They are also seeking increases for their pension plan and their health fund. So basically, they want to be paid fairly. They want to be paid a living wage and they want to be able to stay healthy and they want to be able to retire. They want to have a pension plan okay and Okay, they want better residuals. Do you know what residuals are?

Ted:

So they are the way they've been. What?

Lindsay:

okay, residuals are when your show goes to reruns. Then it goes into syndication and it goes into reruns. They will be paid right then want to be paid for that. Reruns used to mean that you would continue getting like if you wrote an episode. Say you wrote an episode of mash in the 70s and it's getting rerun on TBS or something like that.

Ted:

You still will get paid exactly.

Lindsay:

That's exactly right. but because they're streaming services, now TV isn't relying as much on reruns and there's streaming services. So Basically, the WGA wants it says here This is an article from the Associated Press. It says that they're They want to get paid more up front.

Ted:

Oh, that's not right.

Lindsay:

Well, it's not. It's not right for people to be making as little money. It's not right for producers to invent a new way for people to get TV and then say, oh too bad, so sad, we didn't know that this was going to happen, so We didn't know, so we don't have to pay you for this new media kind of thing. Okay. Also, the Union wants TV shows to staff a certain number of writers for a period of time, so they at issue is the rising practice of mini rooms, where only a handful of writers are working on a series, and Their point is that if you only have a few people to work with, you're not gonna have as many good ideas. But if you have a lot of people to work with, you can have more good ideas and you can sort of all check each other's work and help each other out. At least that's how it's supposed to work.

Ted:

Oh yeah um.

Lindsay:

So you know, teamwork makes the dream work, all that stuff Like that episode, the monkeys.

Ted:

were he asked for a groovy idea for the writers?

Lindsay:

Oh, Yeah, how many writers were in the room in that? that's right. Was that Mickey Dolan's? going into the the writers room He said, hey, do you guys have any groovy ideas?

Ted:

Yeah, and what did they say? They just just typed it up.

Lindsay:

Oh, they typed it up and handed it to him, okay. but the other thing that's scary is AI. writers are also increasingly concerned. that producer, that producers We'll use artificial intelligence to write scripts or at least fill in the blanks on unfinished screenplays. The fast advancing technology has potentially widespread ramifications for Hollywood and in some cases, may be a useful tool, but the WGA wants production companies to agree to safeguards around its usage, so what they're afraid is going to happen.

Lindsay:

basically is that like, for example, some idiot producer who doesn't know anything about the craft of writing says I would like to have a script about my ex-wife and why she's horrible and she smells bad and she's evil, and she gets into a sword fight with my new girlfriend, who is beautiful and tiny and compliant and nice, and they have a big sword fight and they're fighting over me because I'm so wonderful. That's the movie I would like to write. and they say, okay, sir, we'll ask some script writers to try to make that happen for me. He says, no, no, no, we don't need to do that, i will just feed that into a computer and the computer will write a brilliant script for me. But the thing is a script, an AI chatbot or an AI language model, doesn't? an AI language model doesn't know what it's like to feel things or try and fail. All it can do is copy other works, so it's not going to do a very good job of writing screenplays.

Lindsay:

All right, okay. So, ted, do you have any other questions about the writer strike?

Ted:

Well, not at this time. Well, what's that unprecedented? Wow, i know.

Lindsay:

So now we're going to talk about what The Muppets Yay the Muppets.

Ted:

Yay, muppets never get old. So the other day I reviewed the Muppets movie and all that.

Lindsay:

It's a busy hug Ted. pause. Let's talk about Muppets, Mayhem.

Ted:

Okay, we just saw the Muppets. Mayhem was pretty good.

Lindsay:

How many episodes have we seen so far?

Ted:

So, far we've seen three episodes. It's about the lecture Mayhem, the sound assistant, the tyrannical record producer. The record producer, as a big shot, the assistant wants the lecture Mayhem to record the first album because it haven't yet been used since the 1970s to record a record album. All the lecture Mayhem does is tour the Atlantic second-hand kids. They're full of themselves in the life of the kids that never grew up. They're so full of themselves to spend more time back and relax and do any at work. They are so laid back They hardly do any at work.

Lindsay:

Well, Ted, to be fair, the work that a musician does involves playing instruments, right?

Ted:

Yeah, the creative process.

Lindsay:

Right, yeah, so they have a creative process where they sort of like stare for long periods of time. But they also have, you know, they stare for long periods of time or they play pong, remember how the? teeth and voice were playing pong.

Ted:

Hey, that was outdated. We play that with our kids. Get with the times, yeah.

Lindsay:

If you need to like make a zen floaty pool for your brain to relax in, pong is probably the perfect game.

Ted:

Well, anyone who believes that, raise your hand.

Lindsay:

You believe it. You believe pong is cool.

Ted:

All right then.

Lindsay:

All right, pong is cool, so they're so laid back. They're basically sitting around playing pong and giving each other acupuncture. Yeah, stuff like that, right.

Ted:

But in the end they come up, smell like a rose. If that works out, show us those that end up playing. You're literally stepping the hanging off a cliff. We shouldn't set cliffs. It's just dumb. I find it pretty good, Pretty interesting. A scale one to 10, you have a 14.

Lindsay:

Great, i love that one. So, ted, there's some other very important Muppet news. Can you please, please, please, lay it on us, sir?

Ted:

The Maryland Center for History and Culture is going to have exhibition at Jim Henson's Life and Career. There are going to be 30 pups on display. There are going to be clips of Muppets show. There are going to be clips of commercials you did for SK meets at Wilkins Coffee.

Lindsay:

Slow down. There are going to be clips of the commercials.

Ted:

There are going to be clips of the Muppets show playing and there are going to be clips of commercials you did for SK meets at Wilkins Coffee playing every hour of the hour. You need to get your tickets in advance to be able to limit each day for 30 or 40 people every hour of the hour. We will talk about it in the next episode. You will probably get via Puppets if they will let us.

Lindsay:

Well, I don't know about getting Puppets. Oh, you want to bring your puppets and perform them there?

Ted:

No, no, no, Get the photographs of the puppets.

Lindsay:

Oh, get photographs of the puppets. Well, we have to find out what the rules are right.

Ted:

All right, we'll look it up.

Lindsay:

Yeah, but you know what, Ted? Do you want to go to that? Because we would have to plan it.

Ted:

Yes.

Lindsay:

Okay, that sounds interesting. All right, so that is our Muppet News for this time.

Ted:

Okay, This is not an authentic story by Phil Thoreau-Porten and I'm going to cover it.

Lindsay:

Okay.

Ted:

Pelham Pelham's David Hewins seeks to tell a powerful story through his film Babe with Love, with Falls and Stars. The only male down syndrome named Jay Carr Hewins says he has always had passion for films and telling stories. He says God has called him to share. So our Charlie Crow funded a Do-Nish Good to. Tell a Car story.

Lindsay:

So, Teddy, what does crowd funded mean?

Ted:

It's funded by the crowd.

Lindsay:

Yup And this. So there was an article in the Shelby County Reporter about David Hewins movie Made with Love, And what else did you find out about it?

Ted:

I had to make the decision on how to create the funds. Hewins said our first round were raising $50,000 as our test market. It's going to be made with love as people donate into it. This is for me. It's through God. Hewins said being car with a Charlie left altering a moment. So we opened up another door to the right thing. Hewins said I met Jay seven years ago. I fell in love with him. He's changed my life.

Lindsay:

I wonder what. I wish this article told us more about what what Jay Carr does, or what he's like.

Ted:

Well, he's very lovable Being a movie, simple life on a car. Now the streets are now going. True, he knew I was into filmmaking. He was saying I want to be a movie star. I did have. A movie came for me with love. There was a lot of inspiration for Jay's life. Jay spent the inspiration He looks to ripple effect cars. For what?

Lindsay:

happened to other people.

Ted:

Yeah, if I could get Jay to fulfill his dream, it's going to help me to meet other people. He said It's going to help all those other individuals who see themselves as not capable. I want to raise the word is I can get Jay to fulfill his dream? It's going to help so many other people. He said It's going to help all the other individuals who see themselves as not capable. I want to raise the word is how capable these young individuals are. They can do so much during the opportunity. I want to highlight that with Jay. He once said that your love and inspiration for a car Jay is always loving. He said I'll go over. Jay loves the color. I always ask you to color. Have you worked this? I'll be a kid at heart. I always love to get down on the floor to the kids in color. Don't decide. I simply love to make sure I'm sure them The same thing. There is a plus again.

Lindsay:

So basically, what we know about Jay is he likes to sit on the floor and color.

Ted:

Yep, the love in it. We develop a really strong bond. He said he feels there's a lot to love. You love from car. I just learned so much from him. He said now I've got into this film and all the research done for this film, i think I've learned, totally re-arranged, that 50% of those videos. More information can be found on how to donate to me with love. Project Me with love, the moviecom.

Lindsay:

Great So Ted.

Ted:

What.

Lindsay:

Summer's here and the time is right.

Ted:

I know for dancing in the street. Exactly We'll try to get some video and stuff for our trip to the shore this time.

Lindsay:

Oh, I hope we can go to the shore this summer. But you know what? Actually, one thing that was a big deal was we got new what all over the house.

Ted:

We got new windows.

Lindsay:

Yeah, what do you think of the new windows so far?

Ted:

I love the windows.

Lindsay:

They do make everything very quiet, don't they?

Ted:

Yep. Yeah, And they also keep the house Well we found out, they keep the house warm and cool.

Lindsay:

They keep the house warm and cool, which is what we're hoping, and so that was expensive, so I'm not sure if we're going to be able to do a big shore trip this summer.

Ted:

Oh.

Lindsay:

Stickers. We have life in the Ted Lane stickers and our listeners can get a life in the Ted Lane sticker. But what do they have to do to get it?

Ted:

They have to write a review of us.

Lindsay:

No no.

Ted:

They can take our survey and all that. They can find out what they like about the Ted Lane with one present from us.

Lindsay:

What.

Ted:

I want to see more of and what, what was that next? And if you got any talent you want to share, we'll try to post it up.

Lindsay:

So they can just follow the link in the show notes to take the survey Yep, And then we can send them a sticker Exactly.

Ted:

And if you have anyone, sure, tell them a joke in the bug. They're crazy stunned. Sing a song. Tell them a joke. You can actually send it to us and we can review it.

Lindsay:

Maybe put it on our website If you tell us if you send us a voice memo. if you email us a voice memo at info at 6630productionscom. email us a voice memo of you telling a joke, and as long as it's not an explicit audience's joke, we will include it in the podcast. What do you think of that, ted?

Ted:

Yes, just keeping a good taste, nothing keeping it appropriate, Yeah.

Lindsay:

Or you could sing a song. Can you give me an example of an appropriate joke?

Ted:

Ted, why was Chick-A-Lil so upset the other day?

Lindsay:

I don't know.

Ted:

His brother fell some hot tub as brother was born hard boiled Good job Ted, All right.

Lindsay:

So how can people find us on the internet if they want more?

Ted:

You can review us at Apple Podcast or PodChaser or send email to 663productionscom.

Lindsay:

Well, you can send an email to info at 6630productionscom.

Ted:

You can look up my videos on YouTube under Ted Harris' podcast.

Lindsay:

You can share with a friend That would be a great way for people to support the show if they share it with a friend And if they review it on Apple Podcast or PodChaser. when we find out about the review, we can put it on our website.

Ted:

Mm-hmm. Anyway, that's it for episode 11, ted Lang, and we will do a comment on that. And there's something you want to see, just so no one will do it if you get it, and that's our show Bye, bye Life in the Ted Lang production of Harris Productions and 6630 Productions featuring Ted Harris, co-hosted by Lindsay Harris-Brille, music by Vince Brille, edited by Ted Harris. For more information, visit our website at 66storyproductionscom you, you, you, you you.

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